not

adv. expressing negation, esp.:
1 (also n't joined to a preceding verb) following an auxiliary verb or be or (in a question) the subject of such a verb (I cannot say; she isn't there; didn't you tell me?; am I not right?; aren't we smart?).
Usage:
Use with other verbs is now archaic (I know not; fear not), except with participles and infinitives (not knowing, I cannot say; we asked them not to come).
2 used elliptically for a negative sentence or verb or phrase (Is she coming? — I hope not; Do you want it? — Certainly not!).
3 used to express the negative of other words (not a single one was left; Are they pleased? - Not they; he is not my cousin, but my nephew).
Phrases and idioms:
not at all (in polite reply to thanks) there is no need for thanks. not but what archaic
1 all the same; nevertheless (I cannot do it; not but what a stronger man might).
2 not such ... or so ... that ... not (not such a fool but what he can see it). not half see HALF. not least with considerable importance, notably. not much see MUCH.
not quite
1 almost (am not quite there).
2 noticeably not (not quite proper). not that (foll. by clause) it is not to be inferred that (if he said so - not that he ever did - he lied). not a thing nothing at all. not very see VERY.
Etymology: ME contr. of NOUGHT

Useful english dictionary. 2012.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Not — Not, adv. [OE. not, noht, nought, naught, the same word as E. naught. See {Naught}.] A word used to express negation, prohibition, denial, or refusal. [1913 Webster] Not one word spake he more than was need. Chaucer. [1913 Webster] Thou shalt not …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Not — [Contr. from ne wot. See 2d {Note}.] Wot not; know not; knows not. [Obs.] Chaucer. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Not — Not, a. Shorn; shaven. [Obs.] See {Nott}. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • not — adverb Etymology: Middle English, alteration of nought, from nought, pronoun more at naught Date: 13th century 1. used as a function word to make negative a group of words or a word 2. used as a function word to stand for the negative of a… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • NOT — noun Etymology: not Date: 1947 a logical operator that produces a statement that is the inverse of an input statement …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • Not Invented Here — (NIH) is a term used to describe a persistent sociological, corporate or institutional culture that avoids using or buying already existing products, research or knowledge because of its different origins. It is normally used in a pejorative… …   Wikipedia

  • Not but — Not Not, adv. [OE. not, noht, nought, naught, the same word as E. naught. See {Naught}.] A word used to express negation, prohibition, denial, or refusal. [1913 Webster] Not one word spake he more than was need. Chaucer. [1913 Webster] Thou shalt …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Not but — Not Not, adv. [OE. not, noht, nought, naught, the same word as E. naught. See {Naught}.] A word used to express negation, prohibition, denial, or refusal. [1913 Webster] Not one word spake he more than was need. Chaucer. [1913 Webster] Thou shalt …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Not-pated — Not pat ed, Nott pated Nott pat ed, a. Same as {Nott headed}. [Obs.] Shak. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Not so neither — Neither Nei ther, conj. Not either; generally used to introduce the first of two or more co[ o]rdinate clauses of which those that follow begin with nor. [1913 Webster] Fight neither with small nor great, save only with the king. 1 Kings xxii. 31 …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Not to be sneezed at — Sneeze Sneeze, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Sneezed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Sneezing}.] [OE. snesen; of uncertain origin; cf. D. snuse to sniff, E. neese, and AS. fne[ o]san.] To emit air, chiefly through the nose, audibly and violently, by a kind of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English


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